Book Review: Relentless: From Good to Great to Unstoppable by Tim Grover

 

Relentless by Tim Grover can be summed up in one word: instincts. Grover is an athlete/trainer who has taken skilled and talented athletes and pushed them beyond the levels they could imagine. Grover strengthened their bodies and increased their mental tenacity for dominance.

Grover encourages his clients to follow their instincts and be fearless, courageous, and unstoppable—always believing in their limitless possibilities. He tells us that instincts guide them to make the right decisions at the right time, resulting in victory.

Grover’s insights and leadership have helped Michael Jordan, Kobe Bryant, and Dwayne Wade. These NBA players, coached by Grover, reconnected with their instincts and became triumphant again and again. He trained them to unblock their hunger and drive to win and this propelled them to be excellent players winning multiple championships.

As an athletic trainer, he says anyone can connect to their instincts and achieve mastery of their life.

Read Relentless when you are ready to trust your gut, let your instincts be your guide, and go beyond the possibilities to achieve the seemingly impossible and countless victories.

Tim S. Grover, CEO of Attack Athletics, travels the world speaking, consulting, and training the best athletes to be even better. He also offers his principles of mental toughness and dominance to coaches and business leaders.

I would love to hear your comments; Contact me at writerworks@gmail.com

Visit my blog: writerworks.wordpress.com

Diane Williams is the author of “Angels in Action.” Also, she is a Freelance Writer and Speaker.

Touch With Caution: Angels in Action A Reader’s Chapter Reflection

Touch with Caution: Angels in Action (Chapter reflection by Grant Jape)

     As I read this chapter, I couldn’t help but think about what Andy has gone through in his

life. There must have been something in his past experiences that required the attention of a

female in order for him to cope with life. Perhaps, he has never felt that motherly love before,

which can explain the monstrous outrage he committed. However, he also seemed like a boy

that understood his strength. He knew his situation, especially when he saw that he was short

of his allowance due to his bad behavior. He took advantage of this opportunity to intimidate

and express his feelings, knowing there was nothing you can do.

     I feel for children of this manner. A process in their upbringing made them who they are,

and it is not entirely their fault. However, one must always take responsibility for their actions

and that is something that can be explained, but it is a trait that requires self-discipline

and understanding on one’s own heart.

     These types of stories only want to make me love my siblings and future children even

more. I want to cherish them and make sure they are raised with respect and understanding. I

want them to feel sadness and anger, but more importantly I want them to know the tools in

how to fight against such feelings. It shapes them and helps them create an identity.

I would love to hear your reaction!

Diane

Book Review of Angels in Action from Rev. Henry Hayden!

I have been honored to receive this book review from Rev. Henry Hayden:

“Believer or skeptic, you can hardly fail to be moved by these stories of answered prayers, so graciously and lovingly told by Diane Williams. Some attribute miracles to unusual coincidences, but these factual accounts of everyday human life are clearly God’s reply to a specific need or suffering. To read this book is to be shaken in your complacency and challenge you to deepen your faith and change your prayer life. To me, reading this book was a life-changing experience, for which I am grateful to Diane Williams.”

Thank you, Rev. Hayden, for your kind words!

Book Review: The Soloist by Steve Lopez

Los Angeles Times columnist, Steve Lopez demonstrates, “We are our brother’s keeper” in his novel, “The Soloist.” Lopez ventured out of his office into the community in search of his economic need to find a story.  Moving along the streets Lopez stopped to listen to Nathaniel Anthony Ayers, the violinist.

Although Lopez wasn’t a musician he knew the sound of music performed by a trained person; but what he didn’t know was why was this man who once attended the prestigious New York Julliard School and is now playing for free on Skid Row; LA’s largest homeless population. Lopez believed this would be a valuable story.

He engaged in communication with Nathaniel over a period of days, weeks, and months grinding out the details of his life. He discovered that Nathaniel was plagued with the diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia and chose to live on Skid Row, yet this man still had the passion and love for classical music.

At a pivotical point in the unfolding of the story, Lopez decided Nathaniel had a need to have a “normal life” with safety as his primary need to fulfill.  Nathaniel refused, but Lopez being “his brother’s keeper” preserved.

After struggling with Nathaniel to see the benefits of having his own apartment, Lopez began to compare his life with Nathaniel. He focused on his own life acknowledging himself as fortunate; after all, he is healthy, he is educated, he is a professional journalist, he is a homeowner, and he is a husband and a father.  He wanted to use his fortune to help his unfortunate subject, Nathaniel who slept in the unsafe streets with the murders, muggers, drug addicts and the rodents. Yet, Nathaniel continued to refuse.

Respectfully Nathaniel tried to convince Lopez that he was safe and did not need his help to seek an apartment.  Indeed Lopez wanted Nathaniel to move into an apartment and have a more fruitful life. One moment while Lopez ponders Nathaniel repeatedly refusals, he admits to himself that his ego needs Nathaniel to change; he wanted to be identified as his savior.

Through the struggle, Lopez reflects on some of the earlier conversations him and Nathaniel had such as Nathaniel questioning and probing about loving and being committed to something. Nathaniel asked him who some of his favorite writers are, Steve reflects on his college days and admits his skating through classes, applying himself just enough to pass, he had to hesitate and ponder the question and then ask himself, “who is my favorite writer?

Steve had no immediate answers for Nathaniel’s questions.  However, it trigged something in him. Steve acknowledged his lack of relationships, friendships, loyalty, love and passions.

Steve had been functioning perfectly well without those inner displays, just as Nathaniel believed he was okay and functioning without those outer things, which made Steve feel more fortunate than Nathaniel.

Lopez life style agrees with societal view and he sees himself as fortunate and Nathaniel as unfortunate.  Our experiences dictate our lives, Paranoid schizophrenia views Nathaniel life style, and in that world he behaves as his experience dictates, consequently Nathaniel does not express a need to change.

Nathaniel’s behavior leads Lopez to study his diagnosis and its ramifications encourages him to ascertain both primary and secondary research on mental illness.

Lopez is the reason I enjoyed this book, because of his tenacity. Being our brother’s keeper can be a huge challenge as he displays throughout the book.  Not only is Nathaniel Lopez’s brother, but Lopez accepts his position as Nathaniel’s brother.

The two came together and received some unexpected needs for them: restoration for Nathaniel; and Steve begins to understand Nathaniel and gives way to trying to fix him; instead, he develops a loyal friendship. In addition, Lopez searches into other areas for other opportunities: learning to play a guitar, and learning a new language.

 

Lopez and Nathaniel are as different as night and day, yet they walked the streets in the Skid Row community to obtain their needs.  Diversification and community bought them together not only did their lives improve but they became an instrument used to improve each other as well as creating a vehicle to bring a greater need for society…the world.  Together Lopez and Ayers story fostered awareness, educates and funds for the homeless and the mental illness population—“We are our brothers Keeper”

 

Talk to me:   Are you keeping your brother?

 

 

Book Review:

The Soloist

 

Los Angeles Times columnist, Steve Lopez demonstrates, “We are our brother’s keeper” in his novel, “The Soloist”. Lopez ventured out of his office into the community in search of his economic need to find a story.  Moving along the streets Lopez stopped to listen to Nathaniel Anthony Ayers, the violinist.  Although Lopez wasn’t a musician he knew the sound of music performed by a trained person; but what he didn’t know was why was this man who once attended the prestigious New York Julliard School and is now playing for free on Skid Row; LA’s largest homeless population. Lopez believed this would be a valuable story.

He engaged in communication with Nathaniel over a period of days, weeks, and months grinding out the details of his life. He discovered that Nathaniel was plagued with the diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia and chose to live on Skid Row, yet this man still had the passion and love for classical music.

At a pivotical point in the unfolding of the story, Lopez decided Nathaniel had a need to have a “normal life” with safety as his primary need to fulfill.  Nathaniel refused, but Lopez being “his brother’s keeper” preserved.

After struggling with Nathaniel to see the benefits of having his own apartment, Lopez began to compare his life with Nathaniel. He focused on his own life acknowledging himself as fortunate; after all, he is healthy, he is educated, he is a professional journalist, he is a homeowner, and he is a husband and a father.  He wanted to use his fortune to help his unfortunate subject, Nathaniel who slept in the unsafe streets with the murders, muggers, drug addicts and the rodents. Yet, Nathaniel continued to refuse.

Respectfully Nathaniel tried to convince Lopez that he was safe and did not need his help to seek an apartment.  Indeed Lopez wanted Nathaniel to move into an apartment and have a more fruitful life. One moment while Lopez ponders Nathaniel repeatedly refusals, he admits to himself that his ego needs Nathaniel to change; he wanted to be identified as his savior.

Through the struggle, Lopez reflects on some of the earlier conversations him and Nathaniel had such as Nathaniel questioning and probing about loving and being committed to something. Nathaniel asked him who some of his favorite writers are, Steve reflects on his college days and admits his skating through classes, applying himself just enough to pass, he had to hesitate and ponder the question and then ask himself, “who is my favorite writer?

Steve had no immediate answers for Nathaniel’s questions.  However, it trigged something in him. Steve acknowledged his lack of relationships, friendships, loyalty, love and passions.

Steve had been functioning perfectly well without those inner displays, just as Nathaniel believed he was okay and functioning without those outer things, which made Steve feel more fortunate than Nathaniel.

Lopez life style agrees with societal view and he sees himself as fortunate and Nathaniel as unfortunate.  Our experiences dictate our lives, Paranoid schizophrenia views Nathaniel life style, and in that world he behaves as his experience dictates, consequently Nathaniel does not express a need to change.

Nathaniel’s behavior leads Lopez to study his diagnosis and its ramifications encourages him to ascertain both primary and secondary research on mental illness.

Lopez is the reason I enjoyed this book, because of his tenacity. Being our brother’s keeper can be a huge challenge as he displays throughout the book.  Not only is Nathaniel Lopez’s brother, but Lopez accepts his position as Nathaniel’s brother.

The two came together and received some unexpected needs for them: restoration for Nathaniel; and Steve begins to understand Nathaniel and gives way to trying to fix him; instead, he develops a loyal friendship. In addition, Lopez searches into other areas for other opportunities: learning to play a guitar, and learning a new language.

 

Lopez and Nathaniel are as different as night and day, yet they walked the streets in the Skid Row community to obtain their needs.  Diversification and community bought them together not only did their lives improve but they became an instrument used to improve each other as well as creating a vehicle to bring a greater need for society…the world.  Together Lopez and Ayers story fostered awareness, educates and funds for the homeless and the mental illness population—“We are our brothers Keeper”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bell hooks: She Beat The Odds

bell hooks: She Beat The Odds

bell was born in the Deep South. She knew at an early age that she wanted to become a writer however; everyone in her life discouraged her. bell was told that she was a woman (a girl) and she was supposed to fish for a husband and have children. Being a homemaker was to be her only priority in her culture.

While growing bell was taught to be afraid of people… “don’t’ trust them, they’re out to get you so growing up she only had one friend, and even that relationship was hard to nurture. Her family did not welcome her companion into their home, and whenever bell would stay late at the girl’s, house, she would be subsequently punished upon her late arrival home.

bell watched her father make her mother into his servant. He would work all day and come home to a clean home and a prepared meal, for that was what he expected. She watched her mother work hard all day doing these chores, and her father wouldn’t ever say thank you. Whenever her father had a hard day at work, he would take out all his anger on his wife (yell at her, shake her up, and jerk her around). bell decided that marriage was the privilege for the man, and she wanted no part in it.

Through her strife, bell decided to become friends with the library; it was her sanctuary, her refuge. She would read for hours. She initially read romantic books but was disillusioned with the fiction, so she began reading poetry and in being inspired by the words, she began to write poetry herself.

Again, it was difficult for her to pursue her passions because her family tried to dilute her wants when she was a teenager, her family tried to set up with a boyfriend, yet they couldn’t understand why she didn’t want to be with a boy, so they called her “funny.” The more she retracted from her family’s matchmaking sentiments, she was pushed closer and closer to her female friend.

bell intentionally made herself unattractive. She noticed that the boys at her school liked the voluptuous girls so she didn’t eat much. Her wiry frame kept the men away. Even when she was in the library, the librarians gave her dissension for not being out looking for a husband.

She read Austin, Fitzgerald, Shakespeare, Hemingway, and Faulkner, which led to the inevitable conclusion that there was more to the world than the Deep South. She traveled/lived/learned about life through books.  Despite all her obstacles, she is a single woman, writing and teaching at University of California Los Angeles, (UCLA)